Liquid

Advanced Liquid: Group By

This post refers to a legacy version of Siteleaf.

Advanced Liquid: Group By

Following sort and where, this Advanced Liquid post introduces another handy new filter to Siteleaf: group_by.

As the name suggests, this filter allows you to group your content by a certain property.

For example, here’s how we could group all posts by year published:

{% assign posts_by_year = site.posts | group_by:"year" %}

You can group by any property like date, title, slug, even metadata and taxonomy. Here are a few real-world examples you may want to apply to your theme.

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Advanced Liquid: Where

This post refers to a legacy version of Siteleaf.

Advanced Liquid: Where

Now that you are sorting like a pro, we’ll move on to another new and exciting Liquid filter: where.

Where allows us to find content based on a parameter. If you are coming from Jekyll, you’ll be happy to know it follows the same syntax.

For example, here’s how we could find all pages titled “Foo”:

{% assign foo_pages = site.pages | where:"title","Foo" %}

As with sort, you can use any property like date, title, slug, even metadata and taxonomy. Below are few real-world examples you might find useful.

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Advanced Liquid: Sort

This post refers to a legacy version of Siteleaf.

Advanced Liquid: Sort

Liquid is the flexible templating language that powers themes on Siteleaf. While simple at first glance, there’s a lot of power under the hood for those wanting a greater level of control. In this new blog series, we’ll dive deeper and take a look at some advanced Liquid code and examples.

First up in this post, we’ll take a look at the sort filter.

With any site, Siteleaf makes some general assumptions about your content. For example, posts are sorted by date (newest post shows first) and pages are sorted manually. In cases where this doesn’t fit your design, you can utilize the sort filter to order content any way you wish.

For example, here’s how we might sort pages by date:

{% assign sorted = pages | sort:"date" %}

This will sort in ascending order, but we could also choose descending order by adding reverse:

{% assign sorted = pages | sort:"date" | reverse %}

You can sort on any property like date, title, slug, even metadata and taxonomy. Below are few real-world examples you might find useful.

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Quick tip: Assets in meta fields

This post refers to a legacy version of Siteleaf.

Siteleaf makes it easy to assign assets in your metadata fields, just drag and drop (as shown above).

Now in your theme, you can easily link to your asset:

<a href="{{ meta['project_link'] }}">
  {{ meta['project_link_title'] }}
</a>

This is a great way to reference special assets like featured images or PDF downloads.

To learn more about metadata see our tutorial Metadata in Siteleaf.

Using Markdown in metadata

This post refers to a legacy version of Siteleaf.

In previous posts, we talked about using Markdown for text formatting and Metadata for extending your content in Siteleaf.

Markdown makes it easy to add links and *emphasis* to your content without having to write HTML. While your body content uses Markdown by default, you can also apply this easy-to-use formatting to your metadata.

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Layouts in Siteleaf

This post refers to a legacy version of Siteleaf.

Layouts in Siteleaf

In my last article about Siteleaf, I wrote about what goes into porting a theme to Siteleaf from another CMS. This time around, I’ll show you how to write cleaner, less redundant templates through the use of layouts.

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Porting a theme to Siteleaf

This post refers to a legacy version of Siteleaf.

Porting a theme to Siteleaf

Today, I ported another theme to SiteleafAllison House’s Martin theme. I started porting themes to Siteleaf earlier this month as a self-imposed challenge. A friend of mine asked if a particular theme was possible to implement using Siteleaf and rather than answer with a simple ‘yes’, I responded with the ported theme. This was a great way of demonstrating Siteleaf’s adaptability, but also a useful exercise for myself to see where Siteleaf excels and where it falls short. In this post, I’ll walk through porting the Martin theme and show you just how easy it can be.

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Taxonomy in Siteleaf

This post refers to a legacy version of Siteleaf.

Taxonomy in Siteleaf

Last week, I wrote about metadata in Siteleaf and the variety of ways you could use it to customize your website. In this post, I’ll do the same, but with metadata’s much cooler, older brother—taxonomy.

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Developing sites and themes

This post refers to a legacy version of Siteleaf.

Watch Developing sites and themes on Vimeo

In this video, we show you how to create Siteleaf themes using Liquid and develop sites locally using the Siteleaf Ruby Gem and Pow/Anvil.

Watch this tutorial on Vimeo.

Also see: Getting started with Siteleaf

Metadata in Siteleaf

This post refers to a legacy version of Siteleaf.

Metadata in Siteleaf

In Siteleaf, metadata is pure key/value data attached to a site, page, or post. It provides a way to interact with templates beyond the basic usage of injecting title or body copy. Metadata can be used to set inline CSS values or specify the number of posts on a given page—the uses are endless. It’s also very flexible, down to a per-entity level. A post could have a completely unique set of metadata compared to that of its siblings. Let’s look at a few examples.

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Siteleaf overview

This post refers to a legacy version of Siteleaf.

Siteleaf overview

Recently, we at Oak launched a new website publishing platform, called Siteleaf. In short, Siteleaf lets you build your website locally, edit its content in the cloud, and publish to static. In between, it’s so much more. Let me tell you about it.

Develop locally

As the one who makes the websites, you undoubtedly have a dev environment you prefer. All your code is version-controlled, your snippets are award-worthy, and you are one with your text editor. With Siteleaf, there’s no online WYSIWYG editor forced upon you, so you can build your website in the comfort of your own IDE. Use the Siteleaf gem to preview your templates locally using the data from the live server. When you’re ready to go live, simply push the files with the gem or upload them using the website. You can even use Pow or Anvil to preview your sites with a proper hostname.

anvil

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