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Holiday gifts #builtwithsiteleaf

At Siteleaf we are really behind on our Holiday shopping, so we turned to websites that use Siteleaf for some holiday inspiration and they delivered.

Here are a few things that we would love to wake up and find under the tree:

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Girl’s Night In have a selection of goodies for any homebody on your list. We love their going home after this keychain, because it lets everyone know exactly where you would rather be for just $15.

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This simple typographic 2018 Wall Calendar created by Rationale Design provides a beautiful and functional way to keep track of next year’s events for $25. It’s perfect for those who appreciate order and sleek design.

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Snack harder with Aida. You can share these goodies at your holiday party or plough through them from your sofa whilst watching It’s a Wonderful Life. Either way we won’t judge. The full Aida set includes lemon candied pepitas, rye and sourdough crackers, currant turmeric crisps & szechuan candied pecans for $48.

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The Hattie Ewok Backpack is inspired by the Forest Moon of Endor (that’s Star Wars talk for those of you who have been living light-years away). Also, the Rebel Alliance lining is 👌 For $295 you’ll get this great bag, and for every bag that State sells they hand-deliver a backpack packed with essential tools for success to an American child in need. Their website was designed by the great Bondfire Inc.

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At the moment it can feel like the world is on fire. With this Be Kind Banner $16.95 you can remind your family or colleagues to delight in kind gestures. Shop a whole selection of wood products made here in the USA at Woodshop.

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Shopping mates recommend these KeepCups which are $24. They’re made from fully tempered soda lime glass and the band is made with waste from wine cork manufacture. Great for the coffee lovers and the earth conscious alike.

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Is there any home that couldn’t use a little more everyday celebration? We love this Tada Emoji Embroidered Wall Hanging made by the brilliant Jessica Harllee for $70. We have one featuring the 👍 emoji to spread the good vibes in the Siteleaf office.

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These Nourish snacks are ideal stocking stuffers for the health nut in your life. The Double Chocolate Granola Bites are loaded with whole grain oats, chia, and chocolate for $16.60. They’re sure to satisfy the mind, body, and taste buds.


If you have holiday gift ideas let us know @siteleaf

Happy Holidays, Love Siteleaf

Introducing remote themes

Some exciting news! GitHub Pages has announced support for loading remote themes from any GitHub-hosted repository. This is also supported on Siteleaf as of today, whether you publish to GitHub or anywhere else.

Remote themes are similar to Gem-based themes, but do not require Gemfile changes or whitelisting. This means you can now use any of the hundreds of community-curated themes available on GitHub.com, or create your own without having to publish a Gem.

Jekyll themes package layouts, includes, and stylesheets in a way that can be overridden by your site’s content. It’s a great way to maintain a separation of content and code, and makes it possible to share themes across multiple sites.

To build your site with any public, GitHub-hosted theme, add the following to your site’s _config.yml file (or Site Settings in Siteleaf):

remote_theme: owner/name

Replacing owner and name with the repository owner’s username and repository name.

You may also optionally specify a branch, tag, or commit to use by appending an @ and the Git ref (e.g., owner/name@v1.0.0 or owner/name@develop). If you don’t specify a Git ref, the master branch will be used.

Your theme repository must be public and hosted on GitHub.com. As always, your site repository can remain private.

This is made possible behind the scenes through the new jekyll-remote-theme plugin which is now included by default in GitHub Pages and Siteleaf. If you are using a custom Gemfile, make sure to include this or github-pages (version 172 or higher).

If you’re interested in making your Jekyll theme, check out our tutorial and help docs.


Also special shout out to Jekyll which recently turned 9 years old. Thanks to Tom Preston-Werner and all 732 contributors who make it possible for Jekyll to power millions of websites around the world today. Happy birthday! 🎉

Making your first Jekyll theme: Part 1

This is a guest post by David Darnes, creator of the Alembic theme.

By nature, any well structured site that has easily editable content is ‘themeable’ — a layer, or skin, that presents content in the way the owner or creator intended; Jekyll is no different. Pages, posts and any other form of formatted content can be segregated from the templating files.

Themes for Jekyll have been around for a while, but the process of installing a theme was a bit clunky. Content files and templating files would have to be carefully copied over. But, with the introduction of Gem-based themes, themes can now be installed with a couple of lines of code.

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See you at GitHub Universe

Next week the Siteleaf team is heading west for the GitHub Universe conference, October 11th and 12th in San Francisco.

If you are attending the conference or in the nearby area, hit us up! We’d love to meet up and chat with as many Siteleaf users as possible.

A few talks we’re excited to see at GitHub Universe:

  • Real-time collaborative editing: the science behind the magic
  • Caring for your fellow developers
  • Tools as a catalyst for culture change
  • Accessibility: it’s more than just screen readers
  • Balancing identity & privacy: building tools to help users

As a proud sponsor of the conference, we’re excited to offer 15% discount on tickets. Use the promo code COMMUNITYU1715 and come hang with us!

Jekyll 3.5.2 is here

Recently GitHub Pages upgraded to Jekyll 3.5.2, and we’ve now made it our default to match.

This update includes a few enhancements and bug fixes, most notably one which should dramatically speed up generation of your site! In testing jekyllrb.com, generation went from 18 seconds down to 8.

For a full list of revisions check out the release notes.

If you are still using Jekyll 3.4, here’s everything that’s new in 3.5 so far:

  • Jekyll now uses Liquid 4, the latest! It comes with whitespace control, new filters concat and compact, loop performance improvements and many fixes.
  • Themes can specify dependencies and Jekyll will require those. This makes it easier for theme writers to use plugins.
  • The gems key in the _config.yml is now plugins. This is backwards-compatible, as Jekyll will gracefully upgrade gems to plugins if you use the former.
  • Filters like sort now allow you to sort based on a subvalue, e.g. {% assign sorted = site.posts | sort: "image.alt_text" %}.
  • You can now use tab-separated data files.
  • Using layout: none will now produce a file with no layout. Equivalent to layout: null, with the exception that none is a truthy value and won’t be overwritten by front matter defaults.
  • Dramatically faster site generation!
  • Lots more bug fixes.
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Add SSL to your site for free

Add SSL to your site free

Is your website encrypted?

Back in 2014, Google announced it would begin using HTTPS encryption as search ranking signal. If you are still serving your site over basic HTTP in 2017, you may be missing a key part in your SEO strategy.

The good news? It’s never been easier to jump aboard the HTTPS train and secure your traffic.

HTTPS (also known as HTTP over TLS, or Transport Layer Security) uses SSL/TLS certificates to identify your website and encrypt data in transit to your website’s visitors.

Google will be pushing further with the release of Chrome 56 later this month, announcing it will mark all non-HTTPS pages containing password and credit card input fields as “Not Secure”. Eventually, Chrome plans to show a Not Secure warning for all pages served over HTTP, regardless of whether or not the page contains sensitive input fields. Here’s what visitors will see in the new version:

Treatment of HTTP pages with password or credit card form fields in Chrome 56

There are several ways obtain an SSL certificate for your site — many of them are completely free, and only take a few minutes to set up. Since Siteleaf supports publishing to any web host, you can choose the option that best fits your needs.

We’ll review our favorites in this blog post, starting with CloudFront (which we use ourselves for this blog).

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More whitelisted plugins

Hot on the heels of the Jekyll 3.3.1 update earlier this week, four additional plugins have been whitelisted for GitHub Pages.

These plugins are specifically geared toward software documentation and open source code projects on GitHub, but may come in handy for any type of website.

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Jekyll update & new whitelisted plugins

We have updated our default Jekyll version from 3.3.0 to 3.3.1, to match the recent update at GitHub Pages.

This update includes a few minor enhancements and bug fixes. For a full list of revisions check out the release notes.

Also included in this update are two new whitelisted plugins.

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JAMstack e-commerce with Siteleaf & Snipcart

This is a guest post by Charles Ouellet, co-founder of Snipcart.

If you’re reading this blog, you know static web development is trendy, to say the least. Unless you just got out of a years-long meditation retreat in a cave with no Internet. If that’s your case, well, hum, welcome back!

At Snipcart, our developer-first shopping cart platform, we’ve been diving into static site generators and related tools for 2+ years now. And we believe they are the next big thing.

A short while ago, a friend of ours gave an in-depth conference on why “static” is a bad word for the modern front-end stack, aka the JAMstack (JavaScript, APIs, & Markup).

And he’s right:

Static definition

There’s nothing “undesirable” or “uninteresting” about the modern static websites & apps developers are pushing online. It’s in fact quite the opposite.

As a community, we need to give this new paradigm a name worthy of its actual value, and that’s exactly what the JAMstack is.

But this post isn’t a philosophical essay on the benefits of the API economy and the modular development approach. It’s about putting together a killer e-commerce workflow that ticks all of the boxes on the JAMstack checklist:

  • Entire site on a CDN
  • Atomic deploys
  • Instant cache invalidation
  • Everything lives in Git
  • Automated builds

So today, I’m going to show you how to build an API-centric, fast and secure e-commerce project in 5 simple steps. And I’m going to use the right JAMstack tools to do so.

Let’s do it!

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Creating tag pages with Jekyll and Siteleaf

In this tutorial, we show you approaches for creating tag pages in Jekyll and Siteleaf.

This is part two of a tutorial series on Jekyll and Siteleaf. Check out part one on author pages.

The plugin approach

If you plan to use more than a dozen or so tags, a plugin can save you from having to create individual documents for each. This approach lets authors and content managers easily create new tags on the fly, while having autocomplete available in the Siteleaf UI.

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Creating author pages with Jekyll and Siteleaf

At Oak, we recently launched a new website for our friends at Collaborative Fund, built on Siteleaf. The site features a blog for their prolific content, including author and tag pages.

In this tutorial, we show you how to set up your Jekyll blog with author pages and leverage Siteleaf to maintain your content.

The approach we use in this tutorial can be easily adapted to other sets of content as well, not just authors. It also is plugin-less, which means it can be readily published to GitHub Pages on Siteleaf’s free Developer plan.

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Jekyll environments

When working with Jekyll and Siteleaf, you typically have 3 distinct environments to help you code, preview, and publish your site:

  1. development - this is your local machine where theme development takes place. Run jekyll serve and your site will be accessible at http://localhost:4000.

  2. staging - sites on paid plans come with preview functionality. Hit the “Generate preview” button in Siteleaf, and your site will be built with a unique URL without affecting your live site. This URL is shareable, so you can send it to colleagues outside of Siteleaf for feedback or proofreading.

  3. production - where your final website is generated and hosted. This could be GitHub Pages, Amazon S3, Rackspace Cloud Files, or any host that supports (S)FTP (DigitalOcean, MediaTemple, etc).

Starting today, Siteleaf will now set the {{ jekyll.environment }} variable to one of the environments above (previously both preview and publish used production).

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